game development

QA stands for …

Quality Assurance. Not quality testing, not bug tracking, not feedback. Quality assurance. Assurance of Quality.

And so it came to pass…

It Happenethed

I really didn’t think this would happen so quickly. When you’ve been fitting spits and spots of systems together over 6 years towards a goal, you build up an overly active awareness of how much is involved. You’re overly inclined to fill in variables. I knew that the host was easy enough to build, and I’d scripted the mac build for Gophur, so I knew that wasn’t hairy. Recently I’d come to know that now the client and host source is all in one repository I can match source revisions. But, when I tried to put it all together, along with scripting it under Windows … Pop. I think my head just exploded, is that my amygdala on your lapel?

The key to it all was VSoft’s FinalBuilder. There are many build tools, but FinalBuilder is a basically a graphical scripting language / scripting language assembly tool the likes of which you expect from old Amiga tool sets or the Mac. These geniuses of it is delivering the power an old scripting hack like me only images getting from Perl/Python/Ruby/JavaScript/Rexx in a graphical interface.

Virtual Shards

This is actually something that’s been ticking away at the back of my head now for years. Having server clusters and instances just didn’t make a whole lot of sense to me: it produces games that are only “massively” from a back-end perspective. If you’re going to do instances, just throw the server cluster concept away entirely. You can scope player names with a Second Life like approach, but then everything else you just instance.

But to avoid that resulting in a mess, a chaotic world of one-time encounters with no chance of community, I’m suggesting a relational index to allow community – or isolation – of the instances that different player characters might see… Virtual shards.