open source

In-house Open Source

Surely one of the most common reasons for creating a piece of open source software is … ’cause you need it at work.

I’ve never been very comfortable with that — when I’ve had to fix/patch OpenSource software for work, I’ve tended to just sort of do it and hand it back.

But what is the relationship between an employer-user and an employee-vendor when the software is Open Source. The company is paying you to write software which is copyright by the company.

I’m thinking about using DBA within BE. I’ll have to do some work before it’s properly ready for that. But that’s OK. Gives me a goal.

PlayNet have OKed that, but I’d like to go into Jim’s office with a piece of paper bearing my scrawl that says “Hey, I’m not going to embrace & destroy; I’m not going to put bits of BE into my project and then post them on the intratubes; and I’m not going to see a chance to make money out of it and change the licensing on you…”

Any of you ever used any kind of boiler-plate “I’d like to share this bit of code so that from time to time someone else can fix my shit?” – erm – I mean open-source-under-employ-contract license?

GCC supports precompiled headers

What are you talking about? If you ask GCC to compile a file with a “.h suffix, it will write out a similarly named file with “.gch” tacked on the end. And then, when something includes that file, it’ll do some checks and if everything is equal, it’ll use that precompiled header.

(Note: the words “everything” and “equal” and “use” are implementation and implementer specific and as such are subject to interpretation, discussion, reinterpretation, adjustment, argument, debate, readjustment, consideration, evaluation, re-evaluation, alcohol, burning, smiting, testosterone imbalances, puberty, intent to reach puberty within the next couple of years, rejection, dismissal, disregard, disrepect and generally anything but clear definition – if you really want to know, all you have to do is read the source code, stay up to date with the latest revisions from source control, stay active on the mailing list and nearly 40 blogs which occasionally mention gcc, its not like we get paid to do this. Thank you for choosing Open Source!)